Monthly Archives: June 2013

Keeping the Canine in Your Family Up to Par

Pug health

With the ever evolving technology that surrounds the medical and health care industries, there are quite a few things available today that were not a handful of years ago. Lasers to perform delicate, intense surgical procedures; prosthetic limbs that have mechanical parts; and even technologies behind X rays, MRIs, and CT scans have come leaps and bounds. One area that has seen quite a bit of revolutionary technology come through its door is the animal health care field. With the number of pet owners continually growing, it is no surprise that an emphasis has been put on providing quality care for animals in addition to the humans that own them. Knowing about this technological infusion in combination with dog health problems might be the right formula for saving more dogs and cats than anyone ever thought to

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Read This About Pug Health

Pug health

So, you’ve decided to get a dog and even narrows down your search based on breed specific issues and generalized dog health. But there are some dog health problems that can be attributed to the breed of your choice, if you’ve decided to get a Pug, there are some Pug health problems you should be aware of when keeping an eye out for Pug health.

The five common issues you should be aware of with Pug health are easy to discern. The first is Pug Dog Encephalitis, which is an issue unique to the breed. It’s an inflammation of the brain that affects young and middle aged Pugs. Some of the symptoms include, but are not limited to, seizures, lethargy, aggression, loss of balance and listlessness. But PDE, as it’s commonly referred to is easily treated by your veterinarian.

Another common Pug health issue is that of Stenotic Nares, which is a birth defect in short nosed dogs. It’s caused by an overly soft nasal tissue that makes breathing through the nose impossible. The dogs suffering from this often only breathe through their mouth with increases the amount of foamy drool they produce. This issue is easily corrected through surgery.

An Elongated Soft Palate, is another issue common to Pug health concerns and short nose breeds in general. It is an obstruction of the dogs airways that leads to snoring and in more severe cases that honking sound that often comes from barking or a severe wheezing. This is another concern that can easily be alleviated through surgery. Just talk to your vet.

Pigmentary Keratitis and Progressive Retinal Atrophy are another two common issues in Pug health that both deal with the vision of your Pug. The former is a deposit that exists on the cornea of your Pug’s eyes that can irritate and inflame the eye while the later begins as night blindness in younger Pugs and becomes full blindness as time continues. PK can be treated with surgery while PRA can only be treated by the owners understanding of the disease. When you get a Pug, it’s good to know and understand the issues that come with the breed so that you will be more readily able to handle them when they arise.

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